FAMILY LIFE

Can You Marry Your Adopted Sibling?

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Can You Marry Your Adopted Sibling?

As many as half of all adults have no first-hand knowledge about adoption and its quirks. Even so, adoption is a great choice for both children and prospective parents, and about 1 in 32 children in the U.S. live with adoptive families.

Is it Legal to Marry Your Adopted Sibling?

With adoption on the rise and being more common, this means that some people will inevitably marry their adoptive siblings. But, can you marry your adopted sibling? In short – no. Because of all of the legal technicalities involved with adoption – especially inter-country adoptions.

If you have a question about whether or not it’s legal to marry your adopted sibling, the answer is – not in the United States. Nearly all countries discourage incestual relationships and prohibit them outright, including the United States.

Why You Shouldn’t Marry Your Adopted Sibling

Incest is illegal in America, but the taboo may not be as strong for adopted siblings. There could be psychological damage done to those who marry their adopted sibling because they don’t see themselves as blood relatives and this can lead to abuse in a family setting. There is also the problem of family resentment from the parents and possibly from the other children in the family.

Children who are adopted often have a hard time developing their own identity, especially if one or both sets of parents were abusive to them. In this case, marrying someone so similar to them could lead to identity confusion that could result in life-long psychological problems.

Reasons Why You’ve Fallen in Love with Your Adopted Sibling

Deep Similarities

You may be drawn to your sibling because of the deep similarities that you share. You feel like it would just be easier if you were able to view each other like two halves of a whole while still maintaining individuality, like mirrors reflecting one another’s best qualities.

You’d also enjoy being closer to someone who can relate on a deeper level than any other alternative. It can also be nice to not have to worry about explaining certain things to your partner because they’ve already figured it out on their own, or you may revel in the comfort of having someone else who knows exactly what you’re going through.

False Sense of Safety

You may think that you’ll get along with your sibling like a house on fire and will be able to relate hopelessly romantic interests and philosophies. You might assume that the stability of the relationship will make you feel safe, relatively speaking. Sometimes, however, you’ll just find that your family ties are stronger than your feelings.

You may find yourself leaning on them for support instead of allowing them to stand shoulder to shoulder with you in solidarity. You’ll also have the added challenge of having to deal with any lingering animosity from when you began your respective relationships.

You might have had a difficult childhood and a tough time developing relationships with your parents or siblings, but your new family made you feel loved and cared for all the same. Your new family members can’t replace those lost relationships, but they’ll do their best to fill that void.

You’ve Known Them For a While

You might have been in a long-term relationship with your adopted brother or sister for a long time and you can’t imagine your life without them. It may help that you’ve known each other for a while and know more about what to expect from each other. You may feel more comfortable being open with your sibling since they already know most of your deepest darkest secrets.

Your sibling may share some of your passions, such as favorite food, musician, or way of expressing yourself. This makes it easier to get along and bond. You may also share mutual goals and dreams and have the same ideas about how you’re going to achieve them.

 

Julian

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